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Posts Tagged ‘Chinese schools’

This series of posts by Dr. Shibao Guo (University of Calgary, Canada) is a truncated version of an article (Guo, 2012) that appears in a recent special issue of the scholarly journal Canadian and International Education. Part 1 provided an overview of the present state of education for migrants and the curious and little known phenomenon of migrant teachers. Part 2 describes the places where the research was conducted as well as the methods used to collect data.

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Due to the obvious practical limitations of studying such a large phenomenon, this study focused on migrant teachers in two cities, Shenzhen and Zhuhai, both in Guangdong Province. These two cities were chosen because it was in Guangdong that Deng Xiaoping initiated experiments with the market economy in the 1980s, a policy shift that led to the mass migration that we see today. The purpose of the study was to understand the unique conditions, challenges, and experiences of migrant teachers. By 2009, Shenzhen’s population had reached 8.9 million, including 6.5 million migrants (Shenzhen Statistics Bureau, 2010). One third of Zhuhai’s population is people without local hukou (户口-household registration). Given the growing migrant population in both cities and the challenges they face, data collected in this study offers a glimpse into the changes in education and the experience of migrant teachers under China’s market economy. (more…)

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I was going through my photo archive recently and decided that there were a lot of photos that others might find interesting and/or enjoyable. Fortunately they date from a time shortly after I got my first digital camera, so it is quite easy to upload them.

The idea behind what I hope will become a series of short photo essays is that, while we tend to associate “education” with our experiences in schools (i.e., with “schooling”), education really takes place every day and everywhere. In light of this, for the purposes of this series of photo essays, I’ll use the word “pedagogy” instead (here “School Courtyard Pedagogy”). When we view daily life through this lens, a different picture of the places and practices of everyday life emerges.

Having said this, some of these photo essays, beginning with this one, focus on schools and schooling. In what follows, I’ll try to keep the descriptions to a minimum. Enjoy! (more…)

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